Egypt Copts fear fallout from anti-Islam film

CAIRO - Egyptian Christians, who have long complained of discrimination, say they fear that an anti-Islam film produced by Copts in the United States will lead to further persecution at home.

Egypt's churches were among the first to condemn the low-budget Internet film that portrays the Prophet Mohammed as immoral and which sparked violent and often deadly protests throughout the world.

On September 11, demonstrators breached the wall of the US embassy in Cairo in protests that served as a catalyst for clashes between youths and police in the centre of the city.

The Holy Synod of the Coptic Orthodox Church, the highest authority of the Coptic patriarchate, issued a statement slamming the film's release as a "malicious plan aimed at defaming religions and causing divisions among the Egyptian people."

But the condemnations did little to stop hardline Islamists blaming Egypt's Christian community. One preacher, Sheikh Abu Islam, called for burning the Bible during demonstrations outside the US embassy.

"Egyptian Christians' fears have increased because of violent reactions by some extremist Islamists," said Mona Makram Ebeid, a Christian former MP and member of the National Council for Human Rights.

"We were afraid that the reaction would be mainly against the Christians," she told AFP.

"Innocence of Muslims" was apparently produced by a Coptic Christian film-maker and has triggered violent protests around the world.

"Those behind the film are a small group of Copts in the diaspora. The issue should not be linked to Egypt's Copts at all," she said.

Last week, the public prosecutor ordered the trial of seven Egyptian Copts living in North America over their alleged role in the film.

They are accused of "insulting the Islamic religion, insulting the Prophet (Mohammed) and inciting sectarian strife."

"I'm upset about the film and of course Muslims have a right to protest against it," said Christine Ashraf, a Coptic employee at a marketing firm in Cairo.

But "linking it to us and to the Bible also upset me and could inflame sectarianism, particularly among the uneducated," she told AFP.

Regular church-goer Ashraf believes the film aimed "to create sectarianism in Egypt."

Ramy Kamel, a Coptic activist and member of the Maspero Youth Union, a group defending Coptic rights that was created after the 2011 uprising, said he was concerned by the violence of some protests against the film and feared this anger would turn towards Christians.

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