A Singapore press holdings portal

Singapore

Call us the generation of no filters

The New Paper | Catherine Robert | Sunday, Apr 13, 2014

Screengrab from The Chainsmokers’ Selfie music video.

The single is called #Selfie and it has become the soundtrack of choice in clubs all over the world after it topped the Billboard's New Release chart and the iTunes Top Dance Song Chart.

It's one of those tunes that you either hate or love.

But you can't deny that it could certainly qualify as the soundtrack to the lives of those of my generation.

I'd say The Chainsmokers, made up of Alex Pall, 28, and Andrew Taggart, 24, hit the nail on the head with the #Selfie music video, which shows the things that go through a girl's head when she hits the clubs - from gossiping about another girl to talking about boys - just without the video's stereotypical "airhead" Western female accent.

The single boasts very definitive modern lexicon (it even has hashtags).

And it appears in three separate dialogue parts throughout the three-and-a-half-minute song.

The song's music video, which was released at the end of January on YouTube and has since garnered over 56 million views (most probably repeated by us Gen Y youngsters), kicks off with this self-obsessed, drop-dead gorgeous blonde in a nightclub bathroom rambling on about things like booty calls and Instagram likes and ending each of its three dialogue parts with variations of the line, "Let me take a selfie".

If you think about it, this 2014 hit single isn't the first of its kind. It's merely a modern and exaggerated rendition of the good ol' Sir Mix-A-Lot's Baby Got Back tune from 1992.

But the new song, created around a very House-type club tune, has gained much popularity in the last two months, spreading like wildfire around the world, including Singapore's night spots.

It's also got us young women mouthing the ditsy dialogues while twirling our hair for a complete hare-brained image.

But don't mistake that for how we really are. Just because we enjoy mimicking the ladies in the video doesn't mean we're as shallow.

We do it to ridicule the stereotype. We do it because we enjoy (sometimes, a bit too much) the stupidity of it all and because we're not at all afraid to openly indulge in such senseless humour.

No comments yet.
Be the first to post comment.