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Terence Ong
Tuesday, Sep 2, 2014

Sports

Doctors share tips on how to stay in the run

The Straits Times | Terence Ong | Tuesday, Sep 2, 2014

Cardiologist Dr Jeremy Chow (left) and orthopaedic surgeon Dr Tan Ken Jin gave advice to help participants gear up for the upcoming ST Run at the Hub.

Some runners may consider Chin Choon Khim a veteran since he has completed 15 marathons and numerous other running events.

But the 46-year-old banking officer does not think he has learnt everything about his sport, which was why he signed up for a training clinic.

Held yesterday at the Mount Elizabeth Novena Hospital, it was geared to help participants prepare for The Straits Times Run at the Hub on Sept 28.

"No matter how many races you attend, you can never know too much about running so there's always something new to learn, like at this clinic, for instance," said Chin. The clinic was helmed by orthopaedic surgeon Dr Tan Ken Jin and cardiologist Dr Jeremy Chow.

They tapped on their expertise to share insights into the risks a runner can be exposed to.

They also conducted a question-and-answer session that lasted 30 minutes.

Dr Tan, 37, brought up the injuries that can plague the feet of runners and what can cause them - such as training mileage, shape of foot, running style and footwear used. He offered tips on what runners can do to stay clear of an enforced break on the sidelines.

Doing more calf stretches, for example, will condition the legs to take more impact.

Dr Chow, also 37, educated the participants on cardiovascular ailments that can affect runners at any time and focused on sudden cardiovascular deaths (SCDs).

He mentioned the need for runners between the ages of 30 and 40 to go for a heart screening before embarking on strenuous activities like distance running if they had not done so before. "We will always assume we are fine until proven otherwise but, by then, it will be too late when things happen," said Dr Chow.

"You may think you're healthy and have a low risk of cardiovascular diseases but low risk does not equate to no risk at all."

That last piece of advice resonated with Yau Khai Cheong, who had turned up to find out more about SCD.

"The clinic was informative as it gave me a better understanding of cardiovascular health, thus making me aware of how far I can push myself without risking my well-being," said the 47-year-old.

"With this information on hand now, I'm looking forward to doing well at the Sept 28 run," added the marketing manager.


This article was first published on August 31, 2014.
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